California Treasurer John Chiang is committed to ensuring efficient and prioritized state government if elected to the governorship. “The No. 1 expenditure is education, second is healthcare, three is corrections. I want to go through audits where we think some of these programs aren’t working. We’ll performance test it, and [if] it’s not delivering on its promise, we’ll get rid of it.” Photo from SBDC

California Treasurer John Chiang is committed to ensuring efficient and prioritized state government if elected to the governorship. “The No. 1 expenditure is education, second is healthcare, three is corrections. I want to go through audits where we think some of these programs aren’t working. We’ll performance test it, and [if] it’s not delivering on its promise, we’ll get rid of it.” Photo from SBDC

John Chiang, California’s State Treasurer and a Democratic contender for the Golden State’s top office, was the third and final speaker in the gubernatorial candidates’ speaker series, sponsored by Mihaylo College’s office of the Small Business Development Center. Chiang discussed his vision for a more inclusive, efficient and innovative California economy.

For more than a decade, John Chiang has been making history as the first Asian-American to lead California’s top finance departments – first as state controller and now as state treasurer.

Chiang visited Cal State Fullerton’s Irvine campus on Oct. 26 to discuss his vision for the nation’s largest economy, the last in a series of three lectures by California gubernatorial candidates hosted by Mihaylo College’s office of the Small Business Development Center (SBDC) and sponsored by the Orange County Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.

Supporting Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Recognizing that preparing the state’s 19 million-member workforce for the jobs of the future is a top priority, Chiang proposes forging partnerships with the private sector and supporting entrepreneurship. Read More

The leadership board of the Orange County Hispanic Youth Chamber of Commerce includes Mihaylo students Leo Escutia ’19 (third from left) and Berenice Guillen ’17 (second from right).

The leadership board of the Orange County Hispanic Youth Chamber of Commerce includes Mihaylo students Leo Escutia ’19 (third from left) and Berenice Guillen ’17 (second from right).

Mihaylo College students are leading at the Orange County Hispanic Youth Chamber of Commerce, which seeks to foster the professional development of local young people through career preparation events, scholarships and community involvement.

Comprising more than a third of the Orange County population, Hispanics are at the forefront of the region’s economic transformation in the 21st century and own more than 30,000 businesses within the county.

The mission of the Orange County Hispanic Youth Chamber of Commerce (OCHYCC), which is open to local high school seniors and college students of all majors, is to link culturally diverse individuals, aiding them in their personal professional development, assisting them in their path to a higher education and encouraging them to become involved in their communities. The youth chamber hosts invited professional speakers on topics such as entrepreneurship, STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) and interview tips.

Leo Escutia and Berenice Guillen: Mihaylo Students Are OCHYCC Leaders

Each school year, at least two members of the chamber’s board are students from Mihaylo College, most of whom are also involved in the CSUF chapter of the Latino Business Student Association (LBSA). This year’s Mihaylo representatives are Leo Escutia ’19 (pre-business), who is serving as president and CEO, and Berenice Guillen ’17 (finance), community relations officer for OCHYCC and immediate past president of the CSUF LBSA. Read More

Kathy Ly ’15 believes that the Magic Kingdom can be the open door to a magical career. “Disney is the largest employer in Orange County, and we are always looking for talent,” she says. “The key is getting started. After that, anything is possible.”

Kathy Ly ’15 believes that the Magic Kingdom can be the open door to a magical career. “Disney is the largest employer in Orange County, and we are always looking for talent,” she says. “The key is getting started. After that, anything is possible.”

From marketing roles to accounting internships, The Walt Disney Company offers numerous opportunities for students and alumni seeking a career in Southern California.

Mihaylo finance grad Kathy Ly ’15 talks Disney company culture, her tips for students seeking to get involved in the business of the entertainment industry, and her personal career aspirations.

What are the responsibilities of your financial analyst role at The Walt Disney Company?

I support the marketing strategy team through financial planning, forecasting and budgeting for each new Disney marketing campaign. This involves shifting money and managing the entire marketing budget among the various disciplines, such as public relations, media and digital, ensuring that there are enough resources to spend on exciting new events each month. Some examples include Mickey’s Halloween Party and the new Disney California Adventure Oogie Boogie theme land that is going on this October. Read More

Success in the insurance industry requires both academic and professional commitment. “Focus on how you can develop yourself outside the classroom,” says Jeff Brzozowski, university relations manager for Travelers field programs. “A lot of employers want to see a balance between academics and experience outside the classroom, such as internships, volunteerism and on-campus involvement.”

Success in the insurance industry requires both academic and professional commitment. “Focus on how you can develop yourself outside the classroom,” says Jeff Brzozowski, university relations manager for Travelers field programs. “A lot of employers want to see a balance between academics and experience outside the classroom, such as internships, volunteerism and on-campus involvement.”

How can you get started and thrive in careers in the insurance industry? Professionals from Travelers Insurance, one of the nation’s leading carriers, discuss what it takes to have a rewarding and versatile career in underwriting or claims. Check out their tips and info on internships with the company.

An aging population, regulatory changes, increases in meteorological disasters and a booming economy make insurance one of the growth sectors of the American economy. While insurtech – the use of technological innovations to maximize efficiency in the insurance process – is changing the landscape of the industry, today’s college graduates are prime candidates for positions such as underwriters and claims professionals as older generations retire.

Mihaylo College’s Center for Insurance Studies (CIS) is committed to providing education and networking opportunities for Cal State Fullerton students seeking insurance careers. Among their main annual events is iDay, which draws thousands of students and company representatives to the largest insurance career fair in Southern California.

This year’s event on Oct. 18 featured 30 companies, as well as three speakers from sponsor Travelers Insurance, including Nicky Nguyen ’09 (business administration), middle market commercial lines underwriter; Jeff Brzozowski, university relations manager for Travelers field programs; and Kenneth Harrison ’07 (MBA), managing director of commercial accounts for Travelers. They discussed the current state of insurance markets and how students can best leverage themselves for careers in the field. Read More

Former Mihaylo College Dean Anil Puri and Associate Professor of Economics Mira Farka reported that the long-term future of the economic expansion is tenuous, but in the near-term, the recovery should continue. "The good news is that in the near term, the current expansion is set to continue with the economy firing on more cylinders than at any point since the start of the recovery," they said.

Former Mihaylo College Dean Anil Puri and Associate Professor of Economics Mira Farka reported that the long-term future of the economic expansion is tenuous, but in the near-term, the recovery should continue. “The good news is that in the near term, the current expansion is set to continue with the economy firing on more cylinders than at any point since the start of the recovery,” they said.

Former Mihaylo College Dean and CSUF Interim Provost Anil Puri and Associate Professor of Economics Mira Farka presented the 23rd annual economic forecast to local business and academic leaders at The Hotel Irvine on Oct. 25, an event co-sponsored by the Orange County Business Council. The report, which examines the global, national and regional economies, anticipates a continuation of the economic expansion in the short term.

With increases in the gross domestic product (GDP), declining unemployment, increases in median household income, record homeowner equity and an improved economic outlook in other parts of the world, the U.S. economic expansion is continuing, at a slow but steady pace.

As director of the Woods Center for Economic Analysis and Forecasting Anil Puri and Associate Professor of Economics Mira Farka note, if the expansion continues through mid-2019, it will set a record for the longest such period in the post-World War II era.

“Odds are that it may make it, provided the policy environment is calibrated prudently,” they report. “Predictably, as time goes on and the current expansion advances in age, concerns grow about its longevity. In recovery terms, this expansion is practically geriatric: currently in its ninth year, the recovery is the third longest in the post-war era, shy of only two predecessors: the 120-month-long expansion of the 1990s and the 106-month-long expansion of the 1960s.” Read More

Matthew Slagle ’15 believes working in the entertainment industry is all about gaining from the perspectives of others. “Always try to learn from those around you. Never stop asking questions,” he says.

Matthew Slagle ’15 believes working in the entertainment industry is all about gaining from the perspectives of others. “Always try to learn from those around you. Never stop asking questions,” he says.

With an $18.4 billion market in the U.S., the video game industry is big business in today’s economy, propelled by technological advances that make games more interactive and popular among users of all ages.

Earlier this year, Mihaylo grad Matthew Slagle ’15 (entertainment and hospitality management) joined the overwatch team at Blizzard Entertainment, a major Irvine-based video game developer and publisher, as coordinator of global publishing.

The former member of Cal State Fullerton’s Behind the Scenes entertainment and hospitality club and director of corporate relations for the Business Inter-Club Council (BICC) discusses what it’s like to work in the video game industry, how his previous career and academic experience has prepared him for his current role, and tips on how to get started in the entertainment industry. Read More

Chair of the Department of Management Gerard Beenen (left), Mihaylo College Interim Dean Morteza Rahmatian (second from left) and president-elect of APICS Nick Testa (center) met to finalize the Roly White Scholarship.

Mihaylo College leaders and APICS officials, including chair of the Department of Management Gerard Beenen (left), Interim Dean Morteza Rahmatian (second from left) and president-elect of APICS Nick Testa (center) met to finalize the Roly White Scholarship.

The Orange County chapter of the American Production and Inventory Control Society (APICS) has established an endowed scholarship to honor the late Roly White, a local supply chain educator and leader. The award will be given to one or more Mihaylo College student recipients studying operations and supply chain management.

In December 2016, Roly White passed away after a brief illness. White was a supply chain professional who had advanced the industry for more than 40 years through the American Production and Inventory Control Society (APICS), one of the world’s premier professional and certification organizations.

White, who was 73, is remembered by many students and professionals as the driving force behind their decisions to pursue careers in the rapidly growing supply chain field.

In honor of his legacy, friends and colleagues established the Roly White Scholarship, which will benefit one or more high-achieving Mihaylo College students with concentrations in operations and supply chain management. The $25,000 endowed award from APICS will be distributed to students according to the discretion of the Department of Management over a multiyear period.

Nick Testa, president-elect of the Orange County Chapter of APICS, notes that White was supportive of education. “He’s always been very enthusiastic about getting the material out and getting students certified,” he says. “We have a warm spot for the business school, because we believe it is an important way to educate leaders.”

Gerard Beenen, chair of the Department of Management, sees a connection between the scholarship and the opportunities in this industry. “The digital economy is revolutionizing how goods and services are configured, selected and ultimately delivered to consumers. This is true in both online and physical retail venues,” he says. “The Roly White Scholarship will help us identify and reward our most promising operations and supply chain management students, who are ready to lead in this new hyper-competitive business environment.”

APICS has long had a close relationship with Cal State Fullerton’s business program, first partnering with the college to develop a supply chain certificate program. The 43,000-member global society, which relies largely on volunteers, offers three respected certificate programs – CPIM, CSCP and the new CLTD – providing endorsement and education for professionals in the field.

For more information on Mihaylo College’s operations and supply chain concentration, visit the Department of Management online or at SGMH 5313.

The Titan Fast Pitch provides an introduction to entrepreneurship and business networking. “This is a fun way to develop your startup pitch while competing for scholarship money and networking with local business leaders,” says Travis Lindsay, entrepreneur-in-residence for the CSUF Startup Incubator.

The Titan Fast Pitch provides an introduction to entrepreneurship and business networking. “This is a fun way to develop your startup pitch while competing for scholarship money and networking with local business leaders,” says Travis Lindsay, entrepreneur-in-residence for the CSUF Startup Incubator.

Hundreds of students from local universities, colleges and secondary schools will gather at Cal State Fullerton on Oct. 21 for the annual Titan Fast Pitch, in which the entrepreneurs of tomorrow will present their innovative concepts in a 60-second elevator pitch judged by local business leaders. Register today to enter and compete for scholarships! 

In sixty seconds, you can drive one mile on a Southern California freeway (assuming no traffic) or listen to about a third of your favorite song. You can also forge valuable networks, funding and support for your business concept with a so-called 60-second elevator pitch. Articulating your plan in just one minute can be your ticket to success when meeting with investors, corporate executives or prospective partners. You never know where you’ll meet a potential investor, so be prepared!

Prepare for Your Pitch

Students from Cal State Fullerton and other Orange County schools will hone their delivery at the Titan Fast Pitch on Saturday, Oct. 21, from 1 to 4 p.m. More than 60 judges, including Michael Sawitz of FastStart.studio, entrepreneur and consultant Bill Taormina Sr., executive vice president and chief financial officer of Royal Business Bank David Morris, Karl Freels of the Dan Black Family Trust, My-Ngoc Allred of Wells Fargo, and Ash Koumra of Youngry, will provide personalized support for aspiring entrepreneurs in a light-hearted but competitive atmosphere. Read More

California Insurance Commissioner David Jones sees innovation as central to the department’s outreach. “We are very supportive of innovation and we are starting to see new technology, new products and new ways of delivering insurance,” he told attendees at the Insurance Forum at Cal State Fullerton on Sept. 18.

California Insurance Commissioner David Jones sees innovation as central to the department’s outreach. “We are very supportive of innovation and we are starting to see new technology, new products and new ways of delivering insurance,” he told attendees at the Insurance Forum at Cal State Fullerton on Sept. 18.

Insurers collect $289 billion in premiums in California annually, making the state one of the largest insurance markets in the world. Commissioner David Jones discussed the opportunities and challenges California faces in providing coverage for all of the state’s 40 million residents at the Insurance Forum at Cal State Fullerton on Sept. 18.

From regulating the auto insurance market that serves millions of Californians to supporting the commitment to health care for all in the midst of turbulent political times in Washington, D.C., California Insurance Commissioner David Jones has a challenging job.

Since taking office in 2011, the former state assemblyman and legal aid attorney has streamlined the insurance provider licensing process, enabled portability across state lines, established an insurance mechanism for ride-sharing services such as Lyft and Uber, begun the process of updating car insurance regulations for the era of autonomous vehicles, and worked with industry partners to maintain wildfire insurance for homeowners in areas at risk due to climate change and development along the wildland-urban interface.

Providing Insurance for All Californians in Today’s Technological Landscape  

Jones told attendees at the Sept. 18 Insurance Forum presented by Mihaylo College’s Center for Insurance Studies that the mission of the California Department of Insurance is two-fold. Read More

Mihaylo economics alumnus Jay Jefferson credits his career in Sacramento to leadership roles he held as a Mihaylo student. “One of the most important factors in my personal development was my ability to gain exposure to early leadership opportunities. These allowed me to improve my résumé and be an impressive candidate when reviewing work experience for the next opportunity.”

Mihaylo economics alumnus Jay Jefferson credits his career in Sacramento to leadership roles he held as a Mihaylo student. “One of the most important factors in my personal development was my ability to gain exposure to early leadership opportunities. These allowed me to improve my résumé and be an impressive candidate when reviewing work experience for the next opportunity.”

Jay Jefferson II ’12 (economics) is legislative director for California State Assemblyman Mike Gipson (D-Carson). In this role, Jefferson leads the representative’s staff on legislative and budgetary priorities for the 64th Assembly District, which encompasses much of the Los Angeles South Bay area. He discusses the path he took to his current position and how students interested in public sector careers can get started.

What was your path to securing your current legislative director position?

I initially came to Sacramento as a result of the Jesse M. Unruh Assembly Fellowship, which is similar to an internship program and gives 18 fellows an opportunity to serve as direct staff in a legislative office or committee. I was placed in the office of Assemblywoman Holly Mitchell, who is now a state senator.

This role gave me a unique opportunity, in which I staffed one of the toughest committees in the California Assembly, the Assembly Health Committee, and staffed four substantive pieces of legislation, in addition to a resolution, while in my first year. This foundation was a launching pad when I started looking for other opportunities once the fellowship was over. Read More