Frequently Asked Questions

  1. Why Economics?
  2. What does the Department of Economics at CSUF offer?
  3. What is the Difference between a BA in Economics and a BA in Business Administration with concentration in Business Economics?
  4. What are the requirements for the econ major and for the business economics concentration?
  5. What are the requirements for the Economics Minor?
  6. How do I enroll for an internship class, Econ 495
  7. What is the Independent Study, Econ 499?
  8. What skills does the Economics Major provide for the job market?
  9. How does Economics as a major strengthen selection at a graduate school?
  10. How does Economics as a major strengthen your selection at a graduate school?
  11. What Scholarships/awards are available to students?
  12. What are some job links?

1. Why Economics?

Economics is a fascinating major that helps you develop analytical skills that are applicable to a wide range of jobs. Economists work in Wall Street; banking, finance and insurance, all aspects of business; multinational corporations; real estate; utility companies; non-profits; regulation, city, state and federal government agencies; international agencies like the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank; sports, health and aging; and in academia.

Economic issues are powerful enough to shape the world. Slowly but surely, economic issues make their way to your pocketbook. Many pressing social issues have their roots in economics. Microeconomic principles set the foundation for business. Macroeconomic policies shape the destinies of nations. Keynes put it a little more eloquently when he said, “The ideas of economists and political philosophers, both when they are right and when they are wrong, are more powerful than is commonly understood. Indeed the world is ruled by little else.”

According to the National Association of Business Economists (NABE), “The key skills of the economic analyst compared to other business analysts is the ability to link industry/market developments to the overall economy, i.e., to see the forest as well as the trees. The broad training of economists provides a flexibility that allows them to turn their hand to a broad range of analytical problems – a critical attribute in a company experiencing a redirection of industry interests.”

Students pursuing graduate degrees in many other fields, such as the social sciences, business, public administration, public health, environmental studies, urban studies, law, and journalism find that economics is their best choice for an undergraduate major or minor, given the extensive economic content of these programs.


2. What does the Department of Economics at CSUF offer?

  • Bachelor of Arts in Economics
  • Bachelor of Arts in Economics, Minor in Business Administration
  • Concentration in Business Economics: Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration
  • Minor in economics.
  • Masters of Arts in Economics.

Please see viewsheets (available at SGMH3100, SGMH1201, SGMH3313) for details.


3. What is the Difference between a BA in Economics and a BA in Business Administration with concentration in Business Economics?

The Bachelor of Arts in Economics (p 166-p 171 of catalog) gives you the flexibility to use your “free electives” (about 18 units) to

· Take courses in just about any field of your interest such as (but not limited to) Public Administration, Urban Studies, Geography, Statistics, Mathematics, and Insurance to supplement your economics major.  The undergraduate advisor in Economics, Professor Bhattacharya, can help you select “free electives” that match your interests and enhance your job opportunities.

· Take an internship course, Econ 495 that provides you with hands-on experience which will be very useful in your job search. (Note: econ 495 is not counted as an econ elective)

The Concentration in Business Economics is a major in Business Administration with a concentration in Business Economics.   In this case you are required to take specific business courses instead of the “free electives.”  Please see viewsheets (available at SGMH3100, SGMH1201, SGMH3313) for details. Pages 98-99 of catalog


4. What are the requirements for the econ major and for the business economics concentration?

The required courses and the list of electives to choose from are listed in the respective viewsheets. You may obtain these from the dept office (SGMH 3313), undergraduate advisors office (SGMH 1201F) or the College of Business advising office (SGMH 1201). Pages 98-99 of catalog


5. What are the requirements for the Economics Minor?

Please consult the viewsheet in addition to the guidelines below. P 168 of catalog

Let us look at 2 cases:

A. Your major is business administration and your concentration is a field other than business economics such as—Accounting, Marketing, Finance, Management, ISDS, International Business, etc.
In this case, you need to take Econ 320 + 3 electives to fulfill your requirements for a minor. These have to be distinct courses which do not double count for anything else. In today’s global world, a minor in economics with a focus on global courses is an excellent supplement to your major.
B. Your major is outside the College of Business and Economics: please see p 168 of catalog.

6. How do I enroll for an internship class, Econ 495?

Note that this is not counted as an economics elective, but is counted towards the university units. It is a credit/no credit class. The form for registering for an internship is obtained from LH 209. Please check with LH 209 or with the undergraduate advisor for guidelines in choosing an internship that matches your career goals.


7. What is the Independent Study, Econ 499?

Guidelines for the Independent Study can be picked up from the Economics department office SGMH 3313 or from Professor Bhattacharya, the undergraduate advisor at rbhattachary@fullerton.edu or (657) 278-3652


8. What skills does the Economics Major provide for the job market?

According to the recent Occupational Outlook Handbook:

"The growing need for economic analyses in virtually every industry should result in additional jobs for economists. Employment of economists and survey researchers is expected to grow faster than the average for all occupations through 2010."

The Economics major provides you with the following skills that are highly valued by employers.

  • A solid understanding of economic principles that form the foundation of the corporate world and the basis of policy making
  • A solid understanding of the global economy
  • Overall quantitative and qualitative analytical ability
  • Skills in problem solving and computation
  • Skills in looking for sources of data
  • Compilation of data and interpretation of data trends
  • Testing of hypothesis
  • Written communication: writing reports and research papers
  • Oral communication: class presentations and class discussions
  • Experience with statistical packages, such as SAS, Stata, and Eviews

Knowledge of these skills opens doors to a wide range of jobs: city, state, and federal government, Wall Street, law, banking, finance, insurance, real estate, utility companies, non-profits, regulation, sports, health, aging, academia, all aspects of business, and international agencies like the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank.

According to the National Association of Business Economists (NABE), "The key skills of the economic analyst compared to other business analysts is the ability to link industry/market developments to the overall economy, i.e., to see the forest as well as the trees."

Our majors have landed jobs in Merrill Lynch, Walt Disney, Southern California Edison, local consulting companies, city, state, and federal govt agencies, banks, and insurance companies.


9. How does Economics as a major strengthen selection at a graduate school?

Many of our undergraduates have pursued graduate studies in law, business, public administration, public health, environmental studies, urban studies, the social sciences, and journalism. Studies have shown that lawyers with undergraduate degrees in economics earn more than other lawyers.


10. How does Economics as a major strengthen your selection at a graduate school?

Many of our undergraduates have pursued graduate studies in law, business, public administration, public health, environmental studies, urban studies, the social sciences, and journalism.  Studies have shown that lawyers with undergraduate degrees in economics earn more than other lawyers.


11. What Scholarships/awards are available to students?

Please consult the Scholarship Bulletin for several economics awards. These have a deadline early in Spring. This includes 3 awards for the best student paper and awards for graduate study in CSUF and other schools.


12. What are some job links?

Click here for useful job links.
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